Illustrated Primer

April 25, 2013 at 10:36am
0 notes
Script: Eric M. Esquivel
Art: Scott Godlewski
Colors: Ryan Cody
Letters: Henry Barajasvia Warren Ellis

Script: Eric M. Esquivel
Art: Scott Godlewski
Colors: Ryan Cody
Letters: Henry Barajas
via Warren Ellis

April 9, 2013 at 10:49am
2,905 notes
Reblogged from tribeofthestrange

(Source: tribeofthestrange, via nevver)

April 1, 2013 at 2:47pm
156 notes
Reblogged from assortedbakedgoods

2:47pm
16 notes
Reblogged from rootine

rootine:

L’artiste Dean Walton  refait des affiches de films dans un style plus personnel et les vends ici.

February 18, 2013 at 3:05pm
9 notes
CP: So your chess understanding, your positional sense – it’s all human?

Carlsen: I think so, yes. And my fundamental chess understanding was formed without machine involvement. That was my approach to chess, my idea of the struggle.

CP: So you can’t call yourself a tactician or a strategist?

Carlsen: I’d call myself an optimist! In actual fact I don’t have any clear preferences in chess. I do what I think circumstances require of me – I attack, defend or go into the endgame. Having preferences means having weaknesses.

CP: Could you compare your impressions after a win in a subtle endgame or a whirlwind attack? Do they really not differ at all for you?

Carlsen: I really don’t know what I like more in chess. Among other things a game can stand out for the feeling you get when it’s over, when you realize you’ve created something truly worthwhile. But something like that happens very, very rarely. In any case, over the whole course of my life – only a few times.

CP: Well, if you’re just a spectator, which kind of game do you like more?

Carlsen: I don’t know. I like the struggle in itself.

Source

CP: So your chess understanding, your positional sense – it’s all human?

Carlsen: I think so, yes. And my fundamental chess understanding was formed without machine involvement. That was my approach to chess, my idea of the struggle.

CP: So you can’t call yourself a tactician or a strategist?

Carlsen: I’d call myself an optimist! In actual fact I don’t have any clear preferences in chess. I do what I think circumstances require of me – I attack, defend or go into the endgame. Having preferences means having weaknesses.

CP: Could you compare your impressions after a win in a subtle endgame or a whirlwind attack? Do they really not differ at all for you?

Carlsen: I really don’t know what I like more in chess. Among other things a game can stand out for the feeling you get when it’s over, when you realize you’ve created something truly worthwhile. But something like that happens very, very rarely. In any case, over the whole course of my life – only a few times.

CP: Well, if you’re just a spectator, which kind of game do you like more?

Carlsen: I don’t know. I like the struggle in itself.

Source

February 11, 2013 at 7:47am
0 notes

James Blake - Retrograde

New album Overgrown is out April 8.

February 8, 2013 at 11:55am
12 notes

"The blues is an impulse to keep the painful details and episodes of a brutal experience alive in one’s aching consciousness, to finger its jagged grain, and to transcend it, not by the consolation of philosophy but by squeezing from it a near-tragic, near-comic lyricism." - Ralph Ellison

Artist: Bessie Smith
Track: Tain't Nobodys Business If I Do (1923)
February 6, 2013 at 5:04am
2 notes
Wolfgang Pauli and Niels Bohr playing with a tippe top at the inauguration of the Institute of Physics in Lund, Sweden.

(Source: Futility Closet)

Wolfgang Pauli and Niels Bohr playing with a tippe top at the inauguration of the Institute of Physics in Lund, Sweden.

(Source: Futility Closet)

January 30, 2013 at 11:44am
0 notes

One day at work I fall into brine and they close the lid above me by mistake. Much time passes; it feels like long sleep. When the lid is finally opened, everybody is dressed strange, in colorful, shiny clothes. I do not recognize them. They tell me they are ‘conceptual artists’ and are ‘reclaiming the abandoned pickle factory for a performance space.’ I realize something bad has happened in Brooklyn.

— Simon Rich, "Sell Out: Part 1"

January 25, 2013 at 9:02pm
4 notes
"In the early 1970s Lillian Bassman, among the most important fashion photographers of the 20th century, made the decision to dispose of her career, quite literally. Artists do this all the time without the intent — giving themselves over to excess, retreating to ashrams — but Ms. Bassman’s approach was aggressive and determined. Disillusioned by the costuming of the late 1960s, she had had enough of fashion and expressed her disdain by destroying decades’ worth of negatives and placing others in a trash bag in the coal room of her Upper East Side carriage house. Her era of furtive eroticism was over, and there was no point in scrapbooking it.”

"In the early 1970s Lillian Bassman, among the most important fashion photographers of the 20th century, made the decision to dispose of her career, quite literally. Artists do this all the time without the intent — giving themselves over to excess, retreating to ashrams — but Ms. Bassman’s approach was aggressive and determined. Disillusioned by the costuming of the late 1960s, she had had enough of fashion and expressed her disdain by destroying decades’ worth of negatives and placing others in a trash bag in the coal room of her Upper East Side carriage house. Her era of furtive eroticism was over, and there was no point in scrapbooking it.”

(Source: The New York Times)